Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies online

Gain career-ready skills to enhance your current path or prepare yourself for a change in your professional pursuits.

Apply by: 10/12/21
Start class: 11/1/21

Program Overview

Reasons to consider our BA in Liberal Studies

$350 Per Credit Hour
120* Credit Hours

Prepare to pivot yourself to new career opportunities with this BA in Liberal Studies. Expand your knowledge of the world through this interdisciplinary course of study in communications, humanities, social sciences, health sciences, and business.

The rigorous, inquiry-based program features a flexible online format making it ideal for working adults interested in a broad undergraduate education. It capitalizes on the existing strengths of adult learners, allowing you to tailor your education to fit your skills, development needs, and interests. Students will select two tracks as major areas of study. You will complete the program with a capstone course on an individual research topic that synthesizes your study across the two tracks.

Graduates of the BA - Liberal Studies program will:

  • Critically assess a selection of foundational texts within and across various disciplines
  • Conduct research using peer-reviewed research in your chosen fields of study
  • Demonstrate competence in interdisciplinary research through research projects
  • Identify, analyze, compare, and articulate multiple perspectives on real-world issues
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills in writing and presentations
  • Develop a portfolio to showcase your professional goals and strengths for a graduate program or employer
  • Critically assess a selection of foundational texts within and across various disciplines
  • Conduct research using peer-reviewed research in your chosen fields of study
  • Demonstrate competence in interdisciplinary research through research projects
  • Identify, analyze, compare, and articulate multiple perspectives on real-world issues
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills in writing and presentations
  • Develop a portfolio to showcase your professional goals and strengths for a graduate program or employer

Also available:

William Paterson University offers a variety of specialized bachelor's degrees. Check out all of our online undergraduate programs.

$350 Per Credit Hour
120* Credit Hours
Need More Information?

Call 833-960-0139

Call 833-960-0139

Tuition

Budget-friendly tuition can be paid as you go at WP

Online undergraduate programs from William Paterson University offer affordable, pay-by-the-course tuition. All fees are included in the total tuition.

Tuition breakdown:

$350 Per Credit Hour

Tuition breakdown:

$350 Per Credit Hour

Calendar

Mark down these dates and deadlines

William Paterson University online programs are delivered in an accelerated format ideal for working professionals, conveniently featuring multiple start dates each year.

Now enrolling:

10/12/21 Apply Date
11/1/21 Class Starts
TermStart DateApp DeadlineDocument DeadlineRegistration DeadlineTuition DeadlineClass End DateTerm Length
Fall II11/1/2110/12/2110/18/2110/26/2110/28/2112/19/217 weeks
Spring I1/24/221/3/221/9/221/18/221/20/223/13/227 weeks
Spring II3/21/223/1/223/7/223/15/223/17/225/8/227 weeks
Summer I5/16/224/26/225/2/225/10/225/12/227/3/227 weeks
Summer II7/11/226/21/226/27/227/5/227/7/228/28/227 weeks
Fall I9/6/228/16/228/22/228/30/229/1/2210/23/227 weeks
Fall II10/31/2210/11/2210/17/2210/25/2210/27/2212/18/227 weeks

Now enrolling:

10/12/21 Apply Date
11/1/21 Class Starts

Have questions or need more information about our online programs?

Ready to take the rewarding path toward earning your degree online?

Admissions

Applying to WP takes only a few steps

At WP, we've streamlined the admission process to help you get started quickly. Please note all requirements for admission to the BA in Liberal Studies online program, including required documents and where to send them.

The requirements include:

  • Online application
  • Transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended
  • Minimum 2.0 GPA

You must meet the following requirements for admission to this BA online program:

  • Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale
  • Official transcripts from each college attended or high school transcript if no prior college experience
    o Applicants must be at least two years post high school to enroll in our WP Online accelerated programs.
  • Complete online application and submit $50 application fee

Official transcripts, test scores, and other documents should be sent from the granting institutions to:

Email address: [email protected]

Mail address:

Office of Undergraduate Admissions and Enrollment Services
Morrison Hall 102
300 Pompton Road
Wayne, NJ 07470

Courses

A look at the BA in Liberal Studies online program curriculum

For the BA in Liberal Studies major online, you must complete 45 credit hours of liberal studies courses: nine core credits and two 18-credit tracks (selecting two tracks from the nine available). Additional University Core Curriculum credits are required for the 120-credit BA degree. You may transfer up to 90 approved credit hours to decrease cost and time to completion.

Students must complete a total of 36 credit hours in two tracks. Available online tracks include:

  • Business Administration Track (18 credits)
  • Criminology & Criminal Justice Track (18 credits)
  • Critical & Professional Writing Track (18 credits)
  • Communication Studies Track (18 credits)
  • Health Studies Track (18 credits)
  • History Track (18 credits)
  • Psychology Track (18 credits)
  • Social Justice Track (18 credits)
  • Sociology Track (18 credits)
Students must take the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
The portal course to Liberal Studies, the colloquium will vary thematically but will be guided by common objectives. The course introduces students to interdisciplinary, inquiry-based learning. It requires extensive engagement with reading material, substantial writing, library research, and use of instructional technology. These set the framework for the entire program. Colloquium topics may include, for example, “Life Span,” Gender and Society,” “Diasporas”, “War and Peace,” "Technology and Society,” “Citizenship in a Global Age”, or “Individual Freedom and Social Obligation”.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
In every society, individuals must struggle with balancing their own rights and freedoms with their responsibilities towards others. Liberal Studies and Community Engagement explores the ethical reasoning needed to bring individuals together into a community that allows connection and reciprocity while respecting individuals’ autonomy. This course covers topics in social justice and applied ethics such as: responsible citizenship in local, national, and global societies, economic inequality, corporate responsibility, environmental justice, animal rights, reproductive rights, euthanasia, the death penalty, and diversity and equality. The course also discusses strategies for engaging with ethical issues in the community and requires civic engagement projects in which ethical theory is applied.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This seminar will draw on students’ experiences in the Liberal Studies Colloquium and in their two concentrations. Students will select an individual research topic that synthesizes interests they have developed within their concentrations. They will develop this topic throughout the term through extensive interdisciplinary research and writing. Students will share their projects with classmates through classroom presentations and/or online discussion groups, and will exchange detailed feedback with other students. Students will be expected not only to become experts on their topics, but also to teach their topics to their fellow students and to learn from their fellow students’ responses to their topics.
Student must complete the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Introductory course in the fundamental principles of accounting, the theory of debit and credit, account classification, preparation of working papers, adjusting, closing, reversing entries, and preparation of basic financial statements. Use of spreadsheet and word processing computer applications.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course discusses the basic economic principles related to the behavior of individual agents. the main topics include the following: 1) Opportunity Cost, 2) Demand and supply analysis, 3) consumer theory, 4) Production and costs, 5) Profit maximization, 6) Market structure ( perfect comptetition , monopoly, monoplistic competition, and oligopoly), 7) Market failure and the distribution of income ad 8) International trade and exchange rates.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
A study of the basic principles and practices of the financial management of private business corporations. The course provides an operational framework for financial analysis, planning, and forecasting, along with profit analysis and financial control for today’s business world
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Introduces basic principles, policies, problems, and successful methods of business organization and management. Emphasizes management’s ability to analyze, plan, coordinate, and control the varied activities of production, personnel, finance, and marketing. Also examines social responsibility and environmental factors affecting business policy and operation.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Major emphasis on techniques for solving business problems, the development of marketing policies, and the sale of consumer and industrial products. Various marketing decisions are examined with respect to product planning, channels of distribution, promotion activity, selling and sales management, pricing, and international marketing.
Students must select one of the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Included in this course are the topics of descriptive statistics (collection and presentation of data, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, dispersion, and skewness);sampling and probability; and an introduction to statistical inference.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Designed to familiarize students with the legal system with particular emphasis on the court system and administrative agents. Also includes examination of substantive areas such as antitrust, bankruptcy, corporate law, partnership, and securities regulations.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Introduces basic principles, policies, problems, and successful methods of business organization and management. Emnphasizes management’s ability to analyze, plan, coordinate, and control the varied activities of production, personnel, finance, and marketing. Also examines social responsibility and environmental factors affecting business policy and operation.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Provides a framework for the analysis of international management problems. Defines the nature of the international, multi-national, and transnational company. Also examines the evolution of these types of enterprises, develops a model of a multinational firm in a dynamic global setting, and provides a bridge among the disciplines of economics, sociology, political science, and international management.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course introduces students to the theories and practices of human capital management, specifically emphasizing the role human resources plays as a strategic partner in supporting, upholding, and delivering a business entities mission and values. Students will develop and apply the critical thinking skills necessary to integrate the myriad of moving parts involved in the human capital planning process by applying them to real life business situations designed to move a company forward. Some sections of this course are writing intensive.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
The course entails the study of core web marketing concepts and digital marketing strategies. Topics include disruptive technologies, networks, social media, affiliate marketing, online advertising, search engine marketing, and web analytics. The course adopts a strategic marketing approach to help students understand the value creation principles underlying various new digital business models and monetization. Students implement live web projects in which they learn and apply concepts such as digital curation, content creation, keywords advertising, and search engine optimization. The course emphasizes ethical approaches to safeguarding and protecting the privacy of consumers and other stakeholders for the implementation of digital marketing initiatives.
Students must complete the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
In this course, we will examine the functions and the structure of primary agencies involved in the crime prevention and control process, which include the police, courts and corrections. We will also explore some contemporary challenges of the criminal justice system.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course will introduce to the students an overview of (1) the concepts of crime, law and criminology; (2) theories of crime causation; (3) the nature and extent and patterns of different kinds of crimes and social reactions towards the crimes in the American society; and (4) relevant crimes and social policies in other countries. As a writing intensive course, students will engage in writing both as a means to learn the concepts and theories outlined above and as a way to train themselves in conventional styles of criminological writing.
Students must select two of the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
With a comparative approach, this course analyzes how the criminal justics systems interconnect to countries’ crime and crime control issues and to their broader economic and social issues and institutions. It focuses on how countries that have faced major political and social upheavals during the past several decades have struggled to develop workable crime control methods as well as methods of conflict resolution that provide justice for victims, fairness for those accused, and avenues for reconciliation. It also analyzes how global terrorism and internal criminal threats affect countries’ ability to maintain and improve their citizen’s civil liberties and human rights.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
An in-depth analysis of penal institutions from a sociohistorical perspective. Included are how prisons emerged, the “prisonization” process, women’s prisons, and the rehabilitation re-entry process
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Examines the concept of deviance in society through a study of the issues of value judgements, abnormality and eccentricity. Implications are found for the causes of the behavior of groups socially labeled as deviant.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course gives an overview of juvenile offending. It covers the nature, extent, causes, and patterns of juvenile delinquency and status offending. The course also gives an overview of juvenile justice. It covers the structure and functioning of the juvenile justice system and the role of the community in responding to juvenile offending. Included are discussions of major debates and controversies surrounding juvenile offending and justice.
Students must select two of the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course will introduce to the students an overview of (1) the concepts of crime, law and criminology; (2) theories of crime causation; (3) the nature and extent and patterns of different kinds of crimes and social reactions towards the crimes in the American society; and (4) relevant crimes and social policies in other countries. As a writing intensive course, students will engage in writing both as a means to learn the concepts and theories outlined above and as a way to train themselves in conventional styles of criminological writing.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides a broad introduction to white-collar crimes: illegal acts motivated primarily by financial gain, business advantage or power, which are characterized by deceit, concealment, or violation of trust, which are not dependent on the direct application or threat of violence. These crimes nevertheless result in great harm, from physical, economic, and emotional harm to environmental degradation and threats to democracy.  It provides students with an historical and sociological overview of such crimes, an understanding of the major types of white-collar crime, and the key theoretical tools developed to diagnose and explain the problem. It also delivers a critical overview of the scope and societal impact of white-collar crime both in the US and internationally; an analysis of public responses to these crimes; and a discussion of the efficacy of strategies to prevent white-collar offenses from governmental and business organizations.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course seeks to provide students with an overview of intersectional inequalities such as race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexual identity in crime and the administration of justice, focused primarily in the United States. It also addresses differences in offending and victimization among disadvantaged populations. Students will examine historical and current criminal justice policies and the impact of such policies on community of color, poor people, women, the LGBTQ community and other disadvantaged groups (e.g. persons with disabilities and the elderly). In addition, the course will examine theoretical perspectives on class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity and justice. Students will leave this course better understanding the role systems of inequality place in criminal justice policy and practice, and how criminal justice policies and practice impact marginalized populations.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course introduces the study of terrorism from the perspectives of sociology and criminology. Through an overview of international and domestic terrorism and case studies, the course will first examine controversies in defining terrorism and in distinguishing it from other forms of political violence, and provide a typology for understanding the breadth of terrorist organizations. It then explores the historical and sociological roots of terrorism, examines terrorist motivations as well as their organization, strategies, tactics and the effects of these actions. Counterterrorism—both military and law enforcement responses to terrorism—is critically assessed. Last, the class analyzes the framing of terrorism within political, media, and popular discourses.
Students must complete the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Through the study of communication theory as it relates to business and the professions and through practice simulations, the student acquires a knowledge of those communicative and motivational skills essential for success in business and professional life.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This technology-intensive course introduces basic concepts and practices of modern linguistic analysis: how linguists analyze language structure and usage.  Meeting ISTE (International Standards for Technology in Education) and National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers, the course offers systematic training in adapting electronic technologies to linguistic ends.  Students will survey fundamental linguistic categories (e.g. morphemes; phonemes) and techniques, developing their ability to use common hardware/software to collect, analyze and present linguistic data in ethical context.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course will help students develop knowledge of and capability in various approaches to business writing contexts, as well as the forms and styles of business writing. Students will study and produce different products typical in business writing, including such items as reports, letters, proposals, and analyses. This is a writing intensive course.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Intensive work on the elements of successful technical writing through such forms as the expanded definition, instructions, the informative abstract and the long technical report.This course is both Writing and Technology Intensive.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course in nonfiction writing covers a variety of forms and genres, such as the academic paper, the book or film review, the personal essay, and the editorial. Students produce frequent expository and/or analytical writings on selected cultural topics. While learning to edit their own as well as others’ work, students develop skills in writing-as-process, grammar and style, argument, persuasion, and research.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course focuses on designing and creating content for digital spaces. Students will learn to analyze and to write, both individually and collaboratively, in digital genres for various audiences. Students will explore methods of writing and editing for online publication, from site architecture analysis and design strategies to content development and line editing. Students will understand how the arrangement of content and the choice of digital genre impact writing effectiveness, and they will learn to use editing strategies and tools employed by professional writers in a wide range of digital situations. This course is UCC Writing Intensive and UCC Technology Intensive.
Students must select one of the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
A study of oral communication as an interpersonal and dynamic process. Students engage in communication experiencea designed to develop understanding of and skill in public and interpersonal communication.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Students learn the theory and skills of preparing and presenting public speeches. Emphasis is on practice and criticism of classroom speaking experiences.
Students must select five of the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Food is a fundamental dimension of 21st century life, local and global. This class uses food as a lens to examine the structure of our modern world focusing on issues of global health, social justice and environmental justice. Using a variety of approaches, we will examine food as central to social, economic and political life, examining the ways in which social oppression impacts food production, distribution and consumption based on factors of race, gender, and socio-economic class.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Presents an overview of the nature and function of language as a communication tool. Stresses the aspects of language relating to the phonologic, semantic, and linguistic structures.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Through a comparison of numerous cultures, students explore the primary distinguishing characteristics of culture and identify strategies for relating their own culture to those of others. Emphasis is placed on an eclectic cultural design. The primary goal is to provide students with practical and theoretical knowledge and an understanding of intercultural communication in contemporary life situations.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Course focuses on interpersonal communication theory, research, and application. Study and apply the elements of dynamic communication within personal, small group, corporate, and intercultural contexts.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Through the study of communication theory as it relates to business and the professions and through practice simulations, the student acquires a knowledge of those communicative and motivational skills essential for success in business and professional life.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
An examination of the development of persuasion. Emphasizes classical and contemporary theories of rhetoric that are related to contemporary standards and practice in current public address.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
When people interact and form relationships, conflicts inevitably emerge. Conflict has both negative and positive consequences. The way we manage conflict has a profound effect on our relationships. The purpose of this course is to help students understand the nature of interpersonal conflict and the skills used in constructive conflict management.
Students must complete the following course:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course is designed for adult students interested in developing better skills for managing their health. The course will examine various components of health as they apply to adults, ages 30 and older. Topics include mental health and stress management, caring for the health of parents and children, challenges to diet and exercise, sexuality and relationships, management of chronic diseases, managing personal health costs, and examination of issues related to death and dying.
Students must select five of the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course presents an overview of the field of substance abuse and addiction from a bio-psychosocial perspective. Students examine the dynamics of dependency, co-dependency, pharmacology, intervention and treatment modalities, prevention strategies, and community services.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
A foundation study of human nutrition emphasizing its relationship to optimum physical and emotional health. Includes basic of sound nutrition, requirements of various food elements, diet planning, diet patterns for specific age groups, nutritional fads, and weight control.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course is an overview of aging as a biological, psychological, and social process. Behavioral, cultural, and social factors that promote physical and mental well-being in older adults are examined. Topics include ageism, normal physiological changes in mid life and older adults, dementia, substance abuse, residential and environmental needs, family caregivers, retirement, poverty, and public policy in contemporary society.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course examines the biological, sociological, psychological and educational aspects of human sexuality. Students explore personal values, identities and decisions toward the development of a healthy sexual self. Topics include reproductive anatomy and physiology, body image, gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, dating and relationships, communication, reproductive health, contraceptives and pregnancy options, spectrum of sexual expressions and behaviors, and sexual violence/power.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides an overview of the many facets of health care delivery in the U.S. Beginning with an examination of the determinants of health and health disparities, the history, characteristics, personnel, services, costs and future of health care in the U.S are examined.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This technology intensive course will serve as an introduction to the study of disability from a public health perspective. Students will explore how different forms of disability (developmental and acquired) are shaped by and interact with health fields such as maternal and child health, health promotion and communication, health policy and management, environmental health, community health, and epidemiology. Emphasis will be placed on the role assistive technologies play in health promotion for disabled populations.
Students must complete the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the experiences of North American workers from the nineteenth century to the present with a focus on how workers engaged with the problems they confronted and attempted to craft solutions. The course examines the everyday lives and challenges faced by workers at the job site, in their communities, and in their struggles to secure union representation and more favorable public policies. It traces the main outlines of the modern union movement, from the violent confrontations of the late nineteenth century, to the surge in union strength of the mid-twentieth century, to the dramatic membership declines of recent decades in an economy buffeted by globalization, deindustrialization, and downsizing. Special attention will be paid to the particular challenges confronting women, immigrant, and non white workers. The course will consider how particular groups of workers and their supporters engaged within their communities and with civic institutions to address a particular problem or set of challenges.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
A survey of women’s and gender history in the modern era, the course draws comparisons between major world regions. Instructor may focus on one or more area of geographic expertise, exploring how societies have constructed gender and sexual identity; how race, ethnicity, class and other social differences have informed women’s experiences over time; and how societies have developed systemic inequalities and forms of gender-based oppression. Special attention is given to the role of the state, the evolution of feminism. civil and human rights movements, and how individuals and collectives envision and work toward global feminism, sexual and reproductive liberation, and social justice.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
An introduction to the history of the family in one or more major world regions or nations which applies methods from social sciences and demography to explore the evolution of family practices and structures in response to social and technological changes. These include: family formation, lineages, familial relations, household economies, division of labor, reproduction, and inheritance patterns. Areas and periods of study will be determined by the instructor. The course surveys the history of technological innovations in genealogy and demography, and provides grounding in current, discipline-specific research technologies. This course is designated as Technology Intensive
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
An introduction to the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S. from 1955 to 1970. Drawing on interviews, speeches, autobiographies, film, and monographs, the course explores the Movements historical and ideological origins within the context of racial, gender and class inequality in the U.S. society. It discusses how African American men and women, along with whites and other peoples, fought against discriminatory legislation, policies, and practices. The course focuses on the evolution of the African American struggle for social justice and political equality and concludes with the Movements legacy and impact on American society and other movements for social justice. Fulfills UCC Area 3-Historical Perspectives. Cross Listed Course(s): AWS 2910
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Taking its title from Alexis de Tocqueville’s classic Democracy in America, this course examines what it means to be an “American” in the United States. The course will explore the history of ideas of Americanness from the first European settlement in the British colonies to the present. We will investigate how the public sphere, the democratic process, and civic life have changed over the course of the history of the United States. Students will participate in civic life and the democratic process by volunteering for an interest group, public service organization, political campaign, or local election organization. This course will fulfill UCC Area 5 Civic Engagement requirement.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course opens up critical issues of political, economic and social change over a span of two centuries in what is today mainly India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. It covers the period beginning with the colonial encounter in the 1750s through to the aftermath of independence and partition in 1947. Students will analyze the complex global interplay between forces of colonial rule, capitalist transformation and knowledge production. The course will proceed chronologically with emphasis on the following themes: the diverse pre-colonial polities of South Asia; the emergence of the British Empire and its governance practices; the (re-)production of religious, caste and ethnic identities; the politics of anti-colonial resistance, nationalism and the Nation; the debates over gender and the “women’s question;” and the role of violence in shaping community relations across the subcontinent. The course will conclude by exploring recent debates in South Asian historiography concerning the subject of history and the politics of history-writing. This fulfills a UCC Core 6 -Global Awareness.
Students must complete the following course:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course surveys the chief theories, principles, and methodologies of psychology with special emphasis on their relations to human behavior. The biological foundations of behavior, sensory processes, learning, perception, memory, emotion, motivation, personality, and the social bases of behavior and behavior pathology are examined to establish the foundations for advanced study in psychology. Current research findings are included wherever applicable.
Students must select 5 of the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 4
Applied Statistics provides an introduction to basic statistical procedures for the behavioral sciences, including probability theory, hypothesis testing, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Students learn how to use and select among a variety of statistical tests such as z-statistics, t-tests, analysis of variance, and correlation, as well as nonparametric tests such as chi-square. Technology intensive laboratory sessions train students in the use computer software to analyze data and create graphs that are appropriate for the sciences. Students will be charged an additional Psychology Lab Fee when enrolling in this course.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 4
This course builds upon skills acquired by students in PSY 2020. Students continue their study of scientific methods with emphasis upon experimental techniques in the behavioral sciences. Students are trained in a wide range of methods for studying human and animal participants consistent with American Psychological Association guidelines for ethical research. Students will continue to learn to use sophisticated software for the management and analysis of data. This is a writing intensive course that will require students to complete a minimum of 15 pages of formal writing.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides a foundation for understanding human physical, cognitive, and social-emotional aspects of development from conception to death. Theories and research findings of developmental psychology will be examined in its larger environment and socio-cultural context.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to social psychological theory, research, and application. At its best, social psychology is an interdisciplinary endeavor. Thus, in our attempt to understand human social interaction, we draw from sociology, political science, and history, as well as from more traditional psychological sources. Topics to be covered include attitude formation and change, social influence processes, social cognition, moral development, interpersonal attraction, aggression, prejudice, and political psychology.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course introduces the student to the development of modern psychological thought beginning with the Greeks. While some topics, such as dualism, are discussed in terms of earlier origins, the emphasis is upon the development of post-renaissance concepts such as mechanism, determinism, and empiricism. The origins of the scientific method and the early attempt to apply this methodology to psychological issues are also presented from several perspectives. Particular attention is also given to the antecedents, formal development and ultimate fate of the major schools of thought in contemporary psychology.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course surveys the nature and concerns of personality theory. Coverage includes the contributions of major theorists from the classical psychoanalysis, social analytic, humanistic, radical and cognitive behavioristic viewpoints.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores some of the major relationships between brain functions and behavior and the methods and techniques that are currently used to examine these relationships. In addition, current research findings and how these findings impact on our lives are discussed.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course critically examines human information-processing capabilities and limitations. Emphasis will be placed on theoretical principles that underlie various cognitive functions including: attention, perception, memory, language, and problem solving. Developmental aspects of cognition will be included in the discussion of these topics. Students will also be exposed to some of the research that has shed significant light on the nature of cognition.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course introduces students to the science and practice of industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology. Psychological theory and research are applied to the solution of problems in business and industry. After an overview of research methods and the history of I/O psychology, students are exposed to basic concepts from human resources psychology, organizational development, and consumer behavior.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course presents students with an introduction to the breadth of concepts, social issues, and research approaches that characterize community psychology. Unlike many other areas of Psychology,community psychology utilizes an ecological approach in examining adaptive and maladaptive behavior such that it may not be an issue with an individual but rather the fit of the individual with the context. Context here is viewed as multi-layered, behavior is examined as a function of the individual within networks of people, institutions, and social systems. Students will learn to recognize the complexity of the ecological perspective and the many circles of social influence with an eye to advancing the well-being of individuals and communities. In addition to examining theory-based research, this course will also focus on applied service delivery. The promotion of health, the prevention of mental health problems, and the design of community-level interventions will be addressed.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Examines traditional schools of psychology as they pertain to the psychological experience of African-Americans. Alternative psychological considerations relative to the African-American experience, including those advanced by noted African-American psychologists, are also explored.
Students must complete the following course:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course analyzes multiple forms of social oppression and inequality based on race (and color), sex (and gender), sexual orientation (and identity), and class in the United States. It will examine systemic aspects of social oppression in different periods and contexts and the ways that systems of social oppression manifest themselves on individual, cultural, institutional and/or global levels thus becoming self-perpetuating but not wholly unaltered structures. Individual and group agency, strategies of resistance, and visions for change will also be studied.
Students must complete the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course will explore the health disparities that exist among and between groups of people based on the categories of race, ethnicity, gender and class. Situated within the historical record of public health in the United States, this course will review the social, political, cultural, legal and ethical factors that influence health disparities. Significant attention will be given to the idea that health and access to health care is a basic human right in a just society.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course presents an overview of global health issues through examination of major determinants of health and key areas of disease burden. Students will be introduced to the complex tapestry of social, economic, political and environmental factors that affect the health of populations globally. Students will examine global health interventions to understand features of successful programs.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Examines the concept of deviance in society through a study of the issues of value judgements, abnormality and eccentricity. Implications are found for the causes of the behavior of groups socially labeled as deviant.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
A survey of women’s and gender history in the modern era, the course draws comparisons between major world regions. Instructor may focus on one or more area of geographic expertise, exploring how societies have constructed gender and sexual identity; how race, ethnicity, class and other social differences have informed women’s experiences over time; and how societies have developed systemic inequalities and forms of gender-based oppression. Special attention is given to the role of the state, the evolution of feminism. civil and human rights movements, and how individuals and collectives envision and work toward global feminism, sexual and reproductive liberation, and social justice.
Students must select one of the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
In every society, individuals must struggle with balancing their own rights and freedoms with their responsibilities towards others. Liberal Studies and Community Engagement explores the ethical reasoning needed to bring individuals together into a community that allows connection and reciprocity while respecting individuals’ autonomy. This course covers topics in social justice and applied ethics such as: responsible citizenship in local, national, and global societies, economic inequality, corporate responsibility, environmental justice, animal rights, reproductive rights, euthanasia, the death penalty, and diversity and equality. The course also discusses strategies for engaging with ethical issues in the community and requires civic engagement projects in which ethical theory is applied.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Taking its title from Alexis de Tocqueville’s classic Democracy in America, this course examines what it means to be an “American” in the United States. The course will explore the history of ideas of Americanness from the first European settlement in the British colonies to the present. We will investigate how the public sphere, the democratic process, and civic life have changed over the course of the history of the United States. Students will participate in civic life and the democratic process by volunteering for an interest group, public service organization, political campaign, or local election organization. This course will fulfill UCC Area 5 Civic Engagement requirement.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course presents students with an introduction to the breadth of concepts, social issues, and research approaches that characterize community psychology. Unlike many other areas of Psychology,community psychology utilizes an ecological approach in examining adaptive and maladaptive behavior such that it may not be an issue with an individual but rather the fit of the individual with the context. Context here is viewed as multi-layered, behavior is examined as a function of the individual within networks of people, institutions, and social systems. Students will learn to recognize the complexity of the ecological perspective and the many circles of social influence with an eye to advancing the well-being of individuals and communities. In addition to examining theory-based research, this course will also focus on applied service delivery. The promotion of health, the prevention of mental health problems, and the design of community-level interventions will be addressed.
Students must complete the following course:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Examines the structure and dynamics of human society and interprets social behavior within the context of modern society and culture. A prerequisite to all other sociology courses unless waived by the instructor.
Students must complete the following courses:
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
A sociological approach to the study of marriage and family living. The student is required to develop a critical evaluation of studies and research in the field.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
The causes, patterns, and functions of violence. Violence is studied as an extension of biology. A course in the sociobiology of violence in human communities.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores mental illness from a sociological perspective. The course critically reviews the social factors (e.g. race, class, gender, and age) that predict and explain the diagnosis of mental illness, and examines how the status and treatment of people with mental illness are affected by their social characteristics. The role of mental illness in the criminal justice system is also discussed. Major topics of the course include the social history of mental illness, social factors in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness, the stigma of mental illness, legal definitions of insanity, the conditions of confinement for the mentally ill, and mental illness and the death penalty
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Examines the concept of deviance in society through a study of the issues of value judgements, abnormality and eccentricity. Implications are found for the causes of the behavior of groups socially labeled as deviant.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course gives an overview of juvenile offending. It covers the nature, extent, causes, and patterns of juvenile delinquency and status offending. The course also gives an overview of juvenile justice. It covers the structure and functioning of the juvenile justice system and the role of the community in responding to juvenile offending. Included are discussions of major debates and controversies surrounding juvenile offending and justice.
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