Bachelor of Arts in Sociology online

Develop advanced critical thinking and research skills with a bachelor’s degree that increases your professional versatility and expands your career options. This online program prepares you to drive strategy and solve problems in real-world situations.

Apply by: 8/16/22
Start class: 9/6/22

Program Overview

Learn what the online bachelor’s degree in sociology program can do for you

$360 Per Credit Hour
120* Credit Hours

Identify and understand patterns in social behavior with the Bachelor of Arts in Sociology online program from William Paterson University. Our sociology core curriculum empowers you to lead social justice, diversity, and community outreach initiatives that are essential to modern organizations. The 100 percent online coursework increases your multicultural competency, as well as your ability to apply this knowledge to serve communities.

The bachelor’s in sociology online program develops your expertise in qualitative and quantitative analysis, research techniques, and communication. Additionally, this unique degree allows you to explore electives in relevant skill areas like the social organization of work or criminology. Designed for working adults, this program prepares you for a variety of professional opportunities.

Graduates of the BA in Sociology program will:

  • Explain social and historical processes through which sociology as a discipline developed
  • Show mastery of the core knowledge of sociology as a distinctive field of study
  • Describe and distinguish the various research techniques used in sociology
  • Critically evaluate the evidence presented in sociological research reports
  • Design research projects using various sociological data gathering techniques
  • Demonstrate competence in both quantitative and qualitative research methods, and be able to present the results of research projects in an effective manner, both orally and in writing
  • Explain social and historical processes through which sociology as a discipline developed
  • Show mastery of the core knowledge of sociology as a distinctive field of study
  • Describe and distinguish the various research techniques used in sociology
  • Critically evaluate the evidence presented in sociological research reports
  • Design research projects using various sociological data gathering techniques
  • Demonstrate competence in both quantitative and qualitative research methods, and be able to present the results of research projects in an effective manner, both orally and in writing

Also available:

William Paterson University offers a variety of specialized bachelor's degrees. Check out all of our online undergraduate programs. In addition, we have minors available to help you meet your undergraduate credit requirements by integrating coursework that enriches your educational experience.

$360 Per Credit Hour
120* Credit Hours
Need More Information?

Call 833-960-0139

Call 833-960-0139

Add a minor to help meet your credit hour requirement and enrich your educational experience.

Tuition

Affordable, pay-as-you-go tuition at WP

Online undergraduate programs from William Paterson University offer affordable, pay-by-the-course tuition. All fees are included in the total tuition.

Tuition breakdown:

$360 Per Credit Hour

Tuition breakdown:

$360 Per Credit Hour

Calendar

Important dates and deadlines to remember

William Paterson University online programs are delivered in an accelerated format ideal for working professionals, conveniently featuring multiple start dates each year.

Now enrolling:

8/16/22 Apply Date
9/6/22 Class Starts
TermStart DateApp DeadlineDocument DeadlineRegistration DeadlineTuition DeadlineClass End DateTerm Length
Fall I9/6/228/16/228/22/228/29/228/31/2210/23/227 weeks
Fall II10/31/2210/11/2210/17/2210/24/2210/26/2212/18/227 weeks
Spring I1/23/231/2/231/9/231/16/231/18/233/12/237 weeks
Spring II3/23/232/28/233/6/233/13/233/15/235/7/237 weeks

Now enrolling:

8/16/22 Apply Date
9/6/22 Class Starts

Have questions or need more information about our online programs?

Ready to take the rewarding path toward earning your degree online?

Admissions

Learn about the requirements for our online BA in Sociology program

At William Paterson University, we've streamlined the admission process to help you get started quickly and easily. Please read the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Sociology online, including what additional materials you need and where you should send them.

The requirements include:

  • Online Application
  • Transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended
  • Minimum 2.0 GPA
  • Must be at least two years post high school

You must meet the following requirements for admission to this BA online program:

  • Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale
  • Official transcripts from each college or university attended
  • Applicants must be at least two years post high school to enroll in our WP Online accelerated programs.
  • Complete online applications and submit $50 application fee

Official transcripts, test scores, and other documents should be sent from the granting institutions to:

Email address: [email protected]

Mail address:

Office of Undergraduate Admissions and Enrollment Services
Morrison Hall 102
300 Pompton Road
Wayne, NJ 07470

Courses

Check out the online BA in Sociology curriculum

For the BA in Sociology online, you must complete 18 credit hours of sociology core courses and 18 credit hours of sociology electives. Additional University Core Curriculum and elective credits will be required to complete the 120-credit BA degree. You may transfer up to 90 approved credit hours to decrease cost and time to completion

Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Examines the structure and dynamics of human society and interprets social behavior within the context of modern society and culture. A prerequisite to all other sociology courses unless waived by the instructor.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course introduces students to the major theories and theorists in sociology through all historical periods. After an introductory consideration of the scientific method and its application to the study of human social life, it examines the principal categories of theory developed by sociologists. In addition to exploring the distinctive characteristics of each theoretical strategy, the course addresses such important issues as the relationship between theory and empirical research, the changing character of sociological theory over time, and the nature of theoretical controversies and debates in the field. Since this is a Writing Intensive course, students will engage in writing both as a means to learn sociological theories and as a way to develop proficiency in conventional styles of sociological writing.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course teaches students the process of social scientific inquiry. Students will learn the fundamentals of social science research methods, including the process by which research questions are formulated, relevant literature is reviewed, data are collected and analyzed, and results are written up. As this is a writing intensive course, students will learn methods in part through weekly writing assignments. The end product of the course will be a paper or proposal that has been improved through an iterative process of feedback by the professor and revision by the student.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course introduces students to approaches for assembling, analyzing and presenting qualitative and quantitative data. Students will become familiar with a variety of sociologically relevant data that are available online. Students will learn how to conduct basic data analyses in SPSS or Excel in order to address questions of sociological and criminological significance.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course examines stratified inequality in the U.S. across race, gender, and social class lines, including the distribution of power in its multiple forms. This course also considers how themes of social class and concepts of social inequality are (re)produced in the media, art, music, and literature. The aim of this course, in short, is to provide a concrete sense of what it means to talk about structured inequality, to recognize our personal role/position in our stratified society, and to consider acting as change agents who reduce social inequality.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This research-based senior seminar course is an in-depth, critical analysis of the literature and social phenomena in the field of sociology. Each student is expected to select a specific social organization, problem, or policy, explore the current research literature, complete an original independent research project and make a presentation about the empirical findings. Topics vary in each course section according to each instructor’s pre-announced theme. This is a writing intensive course.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course seeks to provide students with an overview of intersectional inequalities such as race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexual identity in crime and the administration of justice, focused primarily in the United States. It also addresses differences in offending and victimization among disadvantaged populations. Students will examine historical and current criminal justice policies and the impact of such policies on community of color, poor people, women, the LGBTQ community, and other disadvantaged groups (e.g. persons with disabilities and the elderly). In addition, the course will examine theoretical perspectives on class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, and justice. Students will leave this course better understanding the role systems of inequality place in criminal justice policy and practice, and how criminal justice policies and practice impact marginalized populations.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides a broad introduction to white-collar crimes: illegal acts motivated primarily by financial gain, business advantage or power, which are characterized by deceit, concealment, or violation of trust, which are not dependent on the direct application or threat of violence. These crimes nevertheless result in great harm, from physical, economic, and emotional harm to environmental degradation and threats to democracy.  It provides students with an historical and sociological overview of such crimes, an understanding of the major types of white-collar crime, and the key theoretical tools developed to diagnose and explain the problem. It also delivers a critical overview of the scope and societal impact of white-collar crime both in the U.S. and internationally; an analysis of public responses to these crimes; and a discussion of the efficacy of strategies to prevent white-collar offenses from governmental and business organizations.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
An analysis of the nature of work, the individual’s relation to work, the organizations workers form to protect their interests, and the interactions among workers, their organizations, and other institutions. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
A sociological approach to the study of marriage and family living. The student is required to develop a critical evaluation of studies and research in the field.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides an overview of the relationship among race, racism and the law throughout the history of the United States. Students will learn about the social construction of race, racism within the U.S. legal and immigration systems and the impact of racial discrimination on U.S. society in areas including access to education, healthcare, housing, patterns of migration, and equal treatment in the criminal justice system. Attempts to overcome racial inequality, such as the Civil Rights Movement, subsequent racial justice such as the American Indian Movement, the Chicano Movement, and the Affirmative Action Programs will also be discussed. The course will conclude with a discussion of the current racial hierarchy and the impact of the racial ideology of colorblindness on racial inequality.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Examines the structural problems facing labor administrative apparatus at the state and local levels. Regional problems related to organizing tasks are discussed within the framework of current labor law and collective bargaining techniques.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Examines the concept of deviance in society through a study of the issues of value judgements, abnormality and eccentricity. Implications are found for the causes of the behavior of groups socially labeled as deviant.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course gives an overview of juvenile offending. It covers the nature, extent, causes, and patterns of juvenile delinquency and status offending. The course also gives an overview of juvenile justice. It covers the structure and functioning of the juvenile justice system and the role of the community in responding to juvenile offending. Included are discussions of major debates and controversies surrounding juvenile offending and justice.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course examines various theoretical perspectives, including images of organizations as decision making systems, as arenas for conflict over power and status, and as elements in broader social and cultural milieus. Within this framework students examine the characteristics of organizational cultures, communication patterns, the role of elites, sources of effective leadership, coercion and control, structures of status and opportunities, market exhanges and exploitation, decision-making processes, treatment of conflict and differences, and participation and recognition of performances of its members
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
The course examines different perspectives and issues in contemporary global sociology. Particular attention is given to non-Western sociological views and perspectives. A number of social inequality issues are analyzed within a global context to examine the international dimension of issues in contemporary society. In addition, students gain an understanding of conducting and implementing research on international development issue.

Interested in adding a minor to your coursework?

Explore your options.

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